From the Magazine05.03.2015

The Great Good News

There are probably countless of pieces of great news out there. Those within the imaginary borders of a beautifully crafted magazine are made even more valuable exactly because they are not countless; instead, they are carefully curated. The best and the most significant.

The Great Good News
The Editor-in-Chief of Time magazine used to say - the most expensive piece of space in New York is Time Magazine. Not a loft in Tribeca or a studio overlooking Central Park. Well, I will say that, more often than not, great news is also good news. Like a degree from a prestigious university that help you get a good job. Like scientific discoveries that help is live and work better in a stressful and dynamic context. Like the perfect summer getaway that helps us refresh our senses.

News finds its way to the front page, however, the value of the front page itself fluctuates each week because, like everything else in the world, news is also convertible. Everything depends on the great and interesting world beyond. The world that generates news. Interesting news, interesting Time, interesting age.

The divide between "the external world of news" and "the way we convey it" is, at the same time, real and symbolic. Just like the yellow frame made infamous by National Geographic, Time Magazine also aims to create a similar divide by using the colour red. Richard Stengel, the editor-in-chief, explains, "This red border separates everything happening outside and everything happening inside the magazine. What finds its place in the magazine is important, significant, urgent, and thought-provoking, while everything outside - not as much."

If news carried a signature, then it would be the red border of a Time Magazine cover. The red frame says it all. News is, in most cases, highlighted in red, it worries, it surprises, it shocks...But not all news is real news. When we're talking about the red border, however, we're talking about the real news.

The red border has not existed since the magazine's inaugural issue. The first 4 years, from 1923 to 1927, Time was published without its iconic, framed cover. One day, while its creators were chatting with a group of newspaper vendors, great news was made. They received advice that proved more valuable than all others: "...boys, you should have beautiful girls on the cover, babies, something yellow or red." Beautiful girls and babies did not fit their concept. Yellow? The 1930s were not a suitable time for the now trendy colour. All that remained was the 'red' and the red pencil with which Philip Kobe, a friend of Time's founders, outlined the border directly onto one of the published covers, rendering it legendary. The first colour covers gave rise to the first coloured borders. The rest is history.

In reality, the golden age of news came much later, in the 1960s. It appeared as though all that had taken place thus far had become irrelevant. When speaking about the United States, the real red line in the news was the 60s themselves. Not because of the fact that in 1963 Kennedy is shot. Or maybe exactly because of it. In American history, up until that point, three times at that, a vice president had become president as a result of an assassination. The introduction of Lyndon B. Johnson to the Oval office after the murder of President Kennedy, however, occurred under very different circumstances. There had been news before but none so great as those that made the front pages in 1963. On November 22nd, 1963, the first live assassination was made possible by the era of television. It was the first time the whole national could see it happen in the same instant. When Air Force One landed in Washington carrying Kennedy's body, after a two hours and six minute flight, 92% of Americans already knew about the death. The shock wave of the news was made even more shocking by the fact that it was aired on television.

However, as you know, what is witnessed on television is witnessed for a mere moment before it dissolves from the screen. What is written within the red, yellow, or green borders of a magazine is lasting. You can browse its pages again after an hour or tomorrow morning. You can carry it with you when you travel. You can discover other news, not simply the ones you are shown in a single moment. In the instant during which you are holding this magazine, not only can you smell the real paper of the page itself, but each page also acts as a vessel for great news making the world a better place to inhabit. Geneva and watches? Yes. Costa Navarino and the sustainable development of the hotel business? Yes. The future of aviation and why haven't you visited Doha yet? There are probably countless of pieces of great news out there. Those within the imaginary borders of a beautifully crafted magazine are made even more valuable exactly because they are not countless; instead, they are carefully curated. The best and the most significant. Because, as you know - these pages are the most expensive space in the world. Because they give hope. And inspire.





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